Monthly Archives: May 2012

First impressions | websites with visual impact

Remember when you dated, or maybe you’re dating now? How crucial is the first impression? For many this determines how the rest of the date will proceed. We have all been there preparing to look our best before we meet our date. The goal is to impress the other person and to keep their attention on you. But do we apply this same principle to our business?

Take a second and go look at two of our recent websites we did for K & J Trucking and Omega Maiden

  

Like the look of these websites? Whatever the answer (and hopefully it was yes), the chances are you made your mind up within the first twentieth of a second. A study by researchers in Canada has shown that the snap decisions Internet users make about the quality of a web page have a lasting impact on their opinions.

We all know that first impressions count, but this study shows that the brain can make flash judgements almost as fast as the eye can take in the information. The discovery came as a surprise to some experts. “My colleagues believed it would be impossible to really see anything in less than 500 milliseconds,” says Gitte Lindgaard of Carleton University in Ottawa, who has published the research in the journal Behaviour and Information Technology1. Instead they found that impressions were made in the first 50 milliseconds of viewing.

Lindgaard and her team presented volunteers with the briefest glimpses of web pages previously rated as being either easy on the eye or particularly jarring, and asked them to rate the websites on a sliding scale of visual appeal. Even though the images flashed up for just 50 milliseconds, roughly the duration of a single frame of standard television footage, their verdicts tallied well with judgements made after a longer period of scrutiny.

In the crowded and competitive world of the web, companies hoping to make millions from e-commerce should take notice, the researchers say.

“Unless the first impression is favorable, visitors will be out of your site before they even know that you might be offering more than your competitors,” -Lindgaard

First impressions

For a typical commercial website, 60% of traffic comes from search engines such as Google, says Marc Caudron of London web-design agency Pod1. This makes a user’s first impression even more critical, he explains.

“You’ll get a list of sites, click the top one, and then either say ‘I’ve engaged’ and give it a few more seconds, or just go back to Google,” he says.

The lasting effect of first impressions is known to psychologists as the ‘halo effect’: if you can snare people with an attractive design, they are more likely to overlook other minor faults with the site, and may rate its actual content (such as this article, for example) more favorably.

This is because of ‘cognitive bias’, Lindgaard explains. People enjoy being right, so continuing to use a website that gave a good first impression helps to ‘prove’ to themselves that they made a good initial decision. The phenomenon pervades our society; even doctors have been shown to follow their initial hunches, Lindgaard says, relying heavily on a patient’s most immediately obvious symptom when making a diagnosis. “It’s awfully scary stuff, but the tendency to jump to conclusions is far more widespread than we realize,” she says.

Beauty and beholder

So what are the key ingredients of a good-looking website? Caudron suggests that the amount of graphics on the page should be strictly limited, perhaps to a single eye-catching image. “It’s not about getting as much stuff on the page as possible,” he says.

These days, enlightened web users want to see a “puritan” approach, Caudron adds. It’s about getting information across in the quickest, simplest way possible. For this reason, many commercial websites now follow a fairly regular set of rules. For example, westerners tend to look at the top-left corner of a page first, so that’s where the company logo should go. And most users also expect to see a search function in the top right.

Of course, says Caudron, the other golden rule is to make sure that your web pages load quickly, otherwise your customers might not stick around long enough to make that coveted first impression. “That can be the difference between big business and no business,” he says.

This week I want to challenge you to do 3 things:

  1. Go look at your website, and write down 5 things you like and 5 things you dislike.
  2. Ask 3 people to go look at your website and give you the same feedback (5 likes & 5 dislike).
  3. Start changing the things you dislike about your website and begin to create a site that has visual impact.

Original article on nature.com by Michael Hopkin Carleton University

-Zach Bauer | 5j Design

29 ways to stay creative

Have you ever gotten your vehicle stuck? Maybe in the snow or mud. You know your stuck almost before it happens, this feeling of “oh no” what am I going to do…for most we think we can get ourselves unstuck. We gas the vehicle and turn the wheels, we rock it back and forth. And what ends up happening is we get ourselves stuck even worse. For most people getting stuck is the worst possible scenario. This is true also with creativity. Many times we hit a rut creatively and no matter how hard we try and push through we eventually succumb to the “creative dead zone”, a place of blank screens and doodles of 3d boxes. But how do we avoid this creative rut? I recently ran across a list of 29 ways to stay creative.

Today I want to pass on some tips and tricks to keep yourself fresh.

  1. Make lists
  2. Carry a notebook everywhere
  3. Try free writing
  4. Get away from the computer
  5. Quit beating yourself up
  6. Take breaks
  7. Sing in the shower
  8. Drink coffee (I couldn’t agree more, but I would like to re-word this to: “Drink good coffee”. In this day in age we have so many great roasters and coffee shops available to us. Read this article if you would like to learn How to choose good coffee . Two of my favorite coffee roasters and shops in Sioux Falls are Coffea and Black Sheep. If you live in the area be sure to go and get a cup of coffee.)
  9. Listen to new music (This for me is one of the greatest ways to be inspired. I will frequently go listen to the Billboard top 100 and listen to whats popular. This works best if you listen to music outside of your preferences (country, hip hop, folk, etc).
  10. Be open
  11. Surround yourself with creative people
  12. Get feedback (Feedback is great, but it depends on who you seek it from. Nothing is worse than getting feedback from someone who doesn’t understand your project and bases everything off of their preferences. The best feedback is from those who have a different perspective then yours but still understands the purpose of feedback.)
  13. Collaborate
  14. Don’t give up
  15. Practice
  16. Allow yourself to make mistakes
  17. Go somewhere new
  18. Count your blessings
  19. Get lot’s of rest
  20. Take risks
  21. Break rules
  22. Don’t force it
  23. Read a page out of the dictionary
  24. Create a framework
  25. Stop trying to be someone else’s perfect
  26. Got an idea…write it down (This is a fantastic practice. This is even easier today with the technology of iphones and droids and the thousands of apps available to write ideas, capture pics & videos. Do yourself a favor and start this today!)
  27. Clean your workspace
  28. Have fun
  29. Finish something

 

-Zach Bauer, 5J Design

29 ways to stay creative by http://paulzii.tumblr.com/post/3360025995